Ten Facts About Weight Stigma – Guest post by Liliana Almeida, Ph.D.

  1. Weight stigma is a bias or discrimination relating directly to weight. Despite the fact that more than half of U.S. citizens are larger-bodied, our society holds a strong negative bias against fatness.
  2. The media reinforces weight stigma. The media, such as news media, displays persons in larger bodies in stigmatizing ways by depicting them sitting and eating unhealthy foods, wearing ill-fitting clothes, headless, or with their abdomens showing.
  3. Weight stigma is based on the belief that weight is under one’s personal control. This belief suggests that larger persons are undisciplined and inactive. However, when weight is attributed to uncontrollable factors such as diabetes or hypertension, people’s attitudes change. 
  4. Weight stigma exists in romantic relationships. Romantically, people in larger bodies are less preferred.  They are less preferred in comparison to those who are in wheelchairs, mentally ill, or those who have sexually transmitted diseases.
  5. Weight stigma starts as early as preschool.  Children ages 3-5 negatively characterize larger children as mean, ugly, stupid and sloppy. As children get older they start believing their larger peers are lazy, less popular, and less happy. College students report that their peers in larger bodies are lazy, self-indulgent, and less attractive, with low self-esteem and deserving less attractive partners.
  6. Teachers have a weight bias towards heavier students. They believe their larger students lack self-control and are less likely to succeed.
  7. Health professionals are also biased. Health professionals treating individuals with eating disorders report believing that larger patients do not comply with treatment recommendations and perceive poor treatment outcomes. Those strongly biased believe larger body sizes are the result of overeating and lack of motivation.
  8. Individuals in larger bodies have internalized stigma. The most common anti-fat bias among larger individuals is the belief that they are lazier and less motivated than thinner individuals. The failed attempts of individuals in larger bodies to lose weight may cause them to begin to internalize society’s beliefs that they are lazy and lack willpower.
  9. Weight stigma increases binge eating. Weight stigma causes psychological distress such as depression, anxiety, and low self-esteem. It is also associated with poor body image and increased fear of fat.
  10. Weight stigma experiences are as common as other forms of discrimination. In women, it is as common as racial discrimination. In some cases, it is more common than gender and age discrimination. 

References 

Ashmore, J.A., Friedman, K.E., Reichmann, S.K., &Musante, G.J. (2008). Weight-based stigmatization, psychological distress, & binge eating behavior among obese treatment-seeking adults. Eating Behaviors, 9, 203-209.

Chen, Eunice & Brown, Molly. (2005). Obesity Stigma in Sexual Relationships.  Obesity Research, 13, 1393-1397.

Cramer, P., & Steinwart, T. (1998). Thin is good, fat is bad: How early does it begin? Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 19, 429-451.

Friedman, K., Reichmann, S., Costanzo, P., Zelli, A., Ashmore, J., & Musante, G. (2005). Weight stigmatization and ideological beliefs: relation to psychological functioning in obese adults. Obesity Research, 13, 907–916.

Latner, J., Wilson, T., Jackson, M., & Stunkard, A. (2010). Greater history of weight-related stigmatizing experience is associated with greater weight loss in obesity treatment. Journal of Health Psychology, 14, 190-199.

Puhl, R., Andreyeva, T., & Brownell, K. (2008). Perceptions Of Weight Discrimination:Prevalence And Comparison To Race And Gender Discrimination In America. International Journal of Obesity, 992-1000.

Puhl, R., & Latner, J. D. (2007). Stigma, obesity, and the health of the nation’s children. Psychological Bulletin, 133, 557-580.

Puhl, R., Latner, J., King, K., & Luedicke, J. (2013). Weight bias among professionals treating eating disorders: attitudes about treatment and perceived patient outcomes. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 1-11.

Puhl, R., Lee Peterson, J., DePierre, J., & Luedicke, J. (2013). Headless, hungry, and unhealthy: A video content analysis of obese persons portrayed in online news. Journal of Health Communication, 1-17.

Stice, E., Presnell, K., & Spangler, D. (2002). Risk factors for binge eating onset in adolescent girls: a 2-year prospective investigation. Health Psychology, 21, 131-138.

Tiggemann, M., & Wilson-Barrett, E. (1998). Children’s figure rating: relationship to self-esteem and negative stereotyping. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 23, 83-88.

Wang, S. S., Brownell, K. D., &Wadden, T. A. (2004). The influence of the stigma of obesity on overweight individuals. International Journal of Obesity, 28, 1333-1337.