EMDR for Eating Disorders

EMDR and Eating Disorders [close up of an eye]
Photo by Amanda Dalbjörn on Unsplash

By Runjhun Pandit, LPCC

EMDR….Sounds scary.

EMDR therapy, these acronyms make it sound like a scary treatment intervention. And oftentimes, when I mention this to my clients, they feel scared or confused. They do have questions about how it works and how it is different from hypnosis.

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is a treatment specifically created to help people deal with a traumatic situation. It was initially developed for veterans who suffered flashbacks and nightmares upon return from war and were trying to readjust back to life with their families. Soldiers experienced reenactment of the wars in their dreams, emotional outbursts leading to frequent conflicts with their families, inability to maintain steady relationships, and dissociation from reality. EMDR hence was developed by Francine Shapiro, Ph.D. with the assumption that eye movements could assist in desensitizing to a traumatic situation. 

The limbic system in our brain is responsible for our behavioral and emotional responses while the brainstem and cortex are the areas that help in relaying the message from the spinal cord to the brain and store the verbal story of the events in our daily lives. When a person experiences a traumatic situation–like an accident or exposure to prolonged emotional distress like abuse or neglect– the usual coping mechanism that would help the person effectively “process” the situation, goes into overdrive. And the limbic system isolates this memory and stores it in the form of an emotional and physical sensation. Due to this isolation, the cerebral cortex doesn’t remember the “story” but the limbic system sends out an emotional response when some events in the present trigger some areas of the traumatic event. Hence, even if the memory is forgotten, the emotions attached to the memory– like pain, anxiety, or body sensations– continue to trigger the person in the present. This prevents a person from experiencing new situations or from living in the moment since oftentimes some parts of the present emotionally burden the limbic system. 

During EMDR sessions, the therapist creates a treatment plan and simulates eye movements similar to the ones that occur during REM sleep by asking the client to follow their fingers. Our brain has the natural capacity to heal itself. During the session, the therapist might also use a light bar to help you track the light across the visual field. These movements last for a minute and the therapist will ask you to report any experience–such as a change in emotions,, memories, or thoughts–after each set of eye movements. By repeating this process, the traumatic memory eventually loses its emotional charge and gets stored in the mind instead as a neutral memory. Frequently, people also have smaller memories associated with the actual traumatic memory which also may get resolved along the way. It has been noted that the “healing” of these smaller memories also creates a noticeable change in a person’s life. 

Although EMDR was developed for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), growing evidence shows that it may also be helpful for the resolution of panic attacks, anxiety, depression, eating disorders, and negative body image. EMDR helps clients process the traumatic memory and assimilate it in a healthier way without an emotional charge. Studies have shown that EMDR can be used in conjunction with Family-Based Treatment (FBT) or Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment (CBT) since these treatments focus on the here and now of the eating behavior while EMDR focuses on the past experiences around body image or food that maintain the disordered eating behaviors. Research has shown that EMDR generates a connection between body, emotions, and cognitions by allowing the elaboration of traumatic events and simultaneously resolving the emotional blocks attached to the traumatic memories. 

A complete EMDR treatment helps the person to “walk through” previously considered traumatic events with greater emotional and impulse control which eventually leads to an increase in feelings of self-worth and self-esteem. 

Runjhun Pandit, LPCC is available to see adolescents for EMDR via telehealth. EMDR can be helpful for food-related traumas and other traumas that might perpetuate eating disorder symptoms such as bullying, body shame, and other invalidating experiences.  To make an appointment with Runjhun Pandit, complete this form

Sources

Bloomgarden A, Calogero RM. A randomized experimental test of the efficacy of EMDR treatment on negative body image in eating disorder inpatients. Eating Disorders: The Journal of Treatment and Prevention. 2008; 16(5): 418–427.

Maria Zaccagnino, Cristina Civilotti, Martina Cussino, Chiara Callerame and Isabel Fernandez (February 1st 2017). EMDR in Anorexia Nervosa: From a Theoretical Framework to the Treatment Guidelines, Eating Disorders – A Paradigm of the Biopsychosocial Model of Illness, Ignacio Jauregui-Lobera, IntechOpen, DOI: 10.5772/65695. Available from: https://www.intechopen.com/books/eating-disorders-a-paradigm-of-the-biopsychosocial-model-of-illness/emdr-in-anorexia-nervosa-from-a-theoretical-framework-to-the-treatment-guidelines

Verardo A, Zaccagnino M, Lauretti G. Clinical applications in the context of attachment: the role of EMDR. Clinical applications in the context of attachment: the role of EMDR. Infanzia e Adolescenza. 2014; 13: 172–184

What’s in Your Soothing/Coping Kit?

Coping Skills Tool BoxClockwise starting at left: adult coloring book and colored pencils, Kinetic Sand (in purple), Enso Buddha Board, scented candle (my favorite—Thymes Kimono Rose), Spek magnetic balls (in purple), good old fashioned Silly Putty, The Squeeze Aromatherapy Dough (in Lavender).

 

We all deal with stress and have to find ways to cope with a range of emotions. Having ways to release stress, distract, soothe, discharge energy, and fidget can help. Whether you are young or old, managing your own stress or supporting a family member, everyone could benefit from a homemade calming toolkit. Here are a few items that are in my toolbox. What’s in yours?

Other ideas for soothing activities could be cuddling with a pet, doing a meditation, listening to calming music, playing Words with Friends, putting essential oil or scented lotion on your arms. What works for each person will be different. Be creative.

Coping With Anxiety During Anxious Times

Anxiety During Anxious Times [image description: back of woman looking at calm lake]
John Mark Arnold, Unsplash

by Carolyn Comas, LCSW

With the global COVID-19 pandemic shutting down not only towns and states but entire countries, our world has entered into an abnormal time. The lives of everyone have been interrupted and disrupted by a virus that can have devastating effects. During this time many people are reporting feeling levels of heightened anxiety and for those already struggling with anxious thoughts, this can be a paralyzing time.

It is natural to feel anxious during a worldwide pandemic. There is something scary out there and there are a lot of questions about what will happen, what the future will be like once we can return back to normal, and whether we can even return back to our old normal.

These thoughts and feelings remind me of when I lived in New York during the September 11th terrorist attacks. While an attack is far different than a virus, there are similarities in the feelings that arise. I, and many others living during that, questioned whether I  was safe, whether this would happen again when it might happen again, and what would happen next. In the months and years to follow our style of living differed slightly. Most apparent was how the structure of airports and entering airports changed. Never again would you come off the plane to see family and friends waiting at the gate. And there were other changes that we all just adapted to which became our new norm. Life became known as living in “Post 9/11.”

I can only assume that we will one day live in a world “Post COVID-19” and move past this pandemic. But It leaves us all with numerous questions including: “Can I get sick? What will happen in the future?” Anxiety loves to live in the “what-ifs” and can cause increased fears and panic. So during this time, a time of uncertainty when many of us feel a lack of control, it is best to look at strategies to manage anxious feelings. 

  1. Limit triggering information. The news can be very triggering so try to limit your news consumption. Just as it was in 2001, the news is 24 hours a day and 7 days a week. However, now,  it can be accessed not just by our computers, radio or television, but right on our phones. Too much information can be overwhelming. Try to limit your media intake to an hour a day and look at getting your information from legitimate sources. In this case, follow a single trustworthy news source or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CD) or the World Health Organization (WHO). Pay attention to your local officials who are setting guidelines in the towns/cities that you live in. 
  2. Reach out for support. While right now we are practicing social distancing, you can still connect to people through phone calls, video calls, online game streaming services, and other social media outlets. Many therapists, dietitians, and medical professionals are offering video sessions. Many support groups have moved online as well. Support can be a click away. You do not have to sit with your thoughts all by yourself.
  3. Practice grounding techniques. If you feel yourself having an anxiety attack try to focus on one sense (i.e sounds) and pay attention to what you hear around you. Or close your eyes and imagine a place that feels safe. Describe back to yourself this safe place and what you see, smell, hear, and feel.
  4. Take deep breaths. Anxiety and panic can increase heart rates. Slowing down your breathing can help decrease the on-edge feelings. There are many great Apps and online videos that offer free-breathing techniques and meditations.
  5. Focus on the present. Focus on what you are able to do right now. We do not know when things may start up again but think about the things you’d like to be ready for. A great example is if your school is paused right now, but you have access to many educational resources, that learning doesn’t need to end.
  6. Lastly, engage in hobbies and activities that you enjoy. Allow yourself to have fun even during these trying times. Anxiety can steal our fun and relaxation so make sure you continue to do things that make you feel good.

It is okay to feel your feelings and it is okay to have anxious thoughts. The above list is a useful tool if you are finding yourself stuck in your anxiousness. While it is an unprecedented time, you can work on managing your reactions to your feelings and thoughts through these coping techniques. If you or someone you know is struggling, the clinicians at Eating Disorder Therapy LA are here to help. We are offering teletherapy sessions for those in California or New York state. For more information or to set up an appointment reach us at 323-743-1122 or e-mail Hello@eatingdisordertherapyla.com