Coping With Anxiety During Anxious Times

Anxiety During Anxious Times [image description: back of woman looking at calm lake]
John Mark Arnold, Unsplash

by Carolyn Comas, LCSW

With the global COVID-19 pandemic shutting down not only towns and states but entire countries, our world has entered into an abnormal time. The lives of everyone have been interrupted and disrupted by a virus that can have devastating effects. During this time many people are reporting feeling levels of heightened anxiety and for those already struggling with anxious thoughts, this can be a paralyzing time.

It is natural to feel anxious during a worldwide pandemic. There is something scary out there and there are a lot of questions about what will happen, what the future will be like once we can return back to normal, and whether we can even return back to our old normal.

These thoughts and feelings remind me of when I lived in New York during the September 11th terrorist attacks. While an attack is far different than a virus, there are similarities in the feelings that arise. I, and many others living during that, questioned whether I  was safe, whether this would happen again when it might happen again, and what would happen next. In the months and years to follow our style of living differed slightly. Most apparent was how the structure of airports and entering airports changed. Never again would you come off the plane to see family and friends waiting at the gate. And there were other changes that we all just adapted to which became our new norm. Life became known as living in “Post 9/11.”

I can only assume that we will one day live in a world “Post COVID-19” and move past this pandemic. But It leaves us all with numerous questions including: “Can I get sick? What will happen in the future?” Anxiety loves to live in the “what-ifs” and can cause increased fears and panic. So during this time, a time of uncertainty when many of us feel a lack of control, it is best to look at strategies to manage anxious feelings. 

  1. Limit triggering information. The news can be very triggering so try to limit your news consumption. Just as it was in 2001, the news is 24 hours a day and 7 days a week. However, now,  it can be accessed not just by our computers, radio or television, but right on our phones. Too much information can be overwhelming. Try to limit your media intake to an hour a day and look at getting your information from legitimate sources. In this case, follow a single trustworthy news source or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CD) or the World Health Organization (WHO). Pay attention to your local officials who are setting guidelines in the towns/cities that you live in. 
  2. Reach out for support. While right now we are practicing social distancing, you can still connect to people through phone calls, video calls, online game streaming services, and other social media outlets. Many therapists, dietitians, and medical professionals are offering video sessions. Many support groups have moved online as well. Support can be a click away. You do not have to sit with your thoughts all by yourself.
  3. Practice grounding techniques. If you feel yourself having an anxiety attack try to focus on one sense (i.e sounds) and pay attention to what you hear around you. Or close your eyes and imagine a place that feels safe. Describe back to yourself this safe place and what you see, smell, hear, and feel.
  4. Take deep breaths. Anxiety and panic can increase heart rates. Slowing down your breathing can help decrease the on-edge feelings. There are many great Apps and online videos that offer free-breathing techniques and meditations.
  5. Focus on the present. Focus on what you are able to do right now. We do not know when things may start up again but think about the things you’d like to be ready for. A great example is if your school is paused right now, but you have access to many educational resources, that learning doesn’t need to end.
  6. Lastly, engage in hobbies and activities that you enjoy. Allow yourself to have fun even during these trying times. Anxiety can steal our fun and relaxation so make sure you continue to do things that make you feel good.

It is okay to feel your feelings and it is okay to have anxious thoughts. The above list is a useful tool if you are finding yourself stuck in your anxiousness. While it is an unprecedented time, you can work on managing your reactions to your feelings and thoughts through these coping techniques. If you or someone you know is struggling, the clinicians at Eating Disorder Therapy LA are here to help. We are offering teletherapy sessions for those in California or New York state. For more information or to set up an appointment reach us at 323-743-1122 or e-mail Hello@eatingdisordertherapyla.com