Condiments, the Final Frontier of Eating Disorder Recovery

By Katie Grubiak, RDN, Director of Nutrition Services

Katherine Grubiak is a Registered Dietitian with a focus on blending Western & Eastern philosophies regarding nutritional healing.

Condiments in Eating Disorder Recovery

In our work with clients with eating disorders, we help them to reintroduce recently eliminated and avoided foods that present as part of the eating disorder. We notice that as clients (both adult and child) reintroduce foods, it is often the condiments and sauces that are the last to be confronted. In some situations, clients never successfully spontaneously reintroduce these foods; we have to strongly encourage them.

“Normal” eaters enjoy ketchup on French fries, mayonnaise on a sandwich, and dressing (with oil) on salads. In fine cooking, sauces such as Hollandaise are elements that complete the dish. Watch any cooking show and you will see how integral the sauces are to the meals.

In addition to adding needed flavor and creaminess to dishes, these sauces and condiments also add the necessary dietary fat that is essential to metabolic function, hormone balance, absorption of fat soluble vitamins (Vitamins A, D, E, K), nerve coating, and ultimately brain healing.  It is said that even after weight restoration, for 6 months the body & brain are still recovering.  Gray matter, which is severely compromised in anorexia, only can be re-layered through the help of essential fatty acids. Recommendations are between 30-40% of total calories coming from dietary fat. How about we rename this macro-nutrient “essential fuels” (EFs) to honor its positive and real use in recovery?

We think it is worth pushing these condiments and sauces as one step towards a full recovery for our clients. If you are a person in recovery or a parent of a person in recovery, we hope you will consider the following suggestions:

  • Try one new condiment on a sandwich or side dish per week. This may include: ketchup, mayonnaise, mustard, aioli, etc.
  • Try dipping chips or vegetables in sauces such as Ranch dressing, salsa, or guacamole.
  • Experiment with one new creamy salad dressing (not fat free) on a salad.
  • Eat a meal that has one new sauce, such as a cream sauce on pasta, a sauce on steak, or an Asian curry.

Here are some recipes:

Chimichurri Sauce-with Argentinian roots its used as both a marinade and a sauce for grilled steak. Also try it with fish, chicken, or even pasta (like a pesto). Chimichurri also makes a great dipping sauce for french bread or a yummy spread on a sandwich! 

  • Prep Time: 8-10 minutes
  • Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup firmly packed fresh flat-leaf parsley trimmed of stems
  • 3-4 garlic cloves
  • 2 TBSP fresh or 2 TSP dried oregano leaves
  • 1/2 cup olive oil (extra virgin cold pressed)
  • 2 TBSP red or white wine vinegar-maybe a rice vinegar
  • 1 TSP sea salt
  • 1/4 TSP ground black pepper
  • 1/4 TSP red pepper flakes (amount depending on level of heat desired)

Finely chop the parsley, fresh oregano, & garlic or place all in a food processor with just a few pushes. Place in a small bowl. Stir in the olive oil, vinegar, salt, pepper, and red pepper flakes to taste. Serve immediately or refrigerate. Perishable-so avoid keeping longer than two days.

Chili Aoli

Condiments in eating disorder recoveryUse on top of meatloaf, meatballs, or on a sandwich.

Total time: 10 minutes | Makes 1 cup.

  • 1 cup mayonnaise
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
  • 3 1/2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 3/4 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons dark chili powder
  • 3/4 tablespoon paprika
  • Salt and pepper

In a small bowl, whisk together all ingredients until smooth. Taste and season as desired with salt and pepper.

Trader Joe’s Wasabi Mayo can really spruce up a turkey sandwich!