April 2018 LACPA Eating Disorder SIG

BermudezLA area professionals are invited to the April 2018 LACPA Eating Disorder SIG event. This event is open to non-members!

Date: Tuesday, April 24th at 7:00 pm 

Presenter: Ovidio Bermudez, MD, FAAP, FSAHM, FAED, F.iaedp, CEDS 

Title: Understanding Brain Development in the Treatment of Eating Disorders

Description: This presentation will review three concepts of the current understanding of brain development.  The first is proliferation and pruning as the brain grows via enhancement of gray matter and white matter.  The second is sequential maturation and fully coming online of different areas of the brain and how this may help us understand emotion regulation.  Third how environmental and hormonal influences may affect brain development.  In addition, how this may be applied to the treatment of eating disorders in children and adolescents will be discussed.

Bio:  Ovidio Bermudez, M.D. is the Medical Director of Child and Adolescent Services and Chief Clinical Education Officer at Eating Recovery Center in Denver, Colorado. He holds academic appointments as Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. He is Board certified in Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine.

Dr. Bermudez is a Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine, the Academy for Eating Disorders, and the International Association of Eating Disorders Professionals. He is Past Chairman and currently Senior Advisor to the Board of Directors of the National Eating Disorders Association, Co-Founder of the Eating Disorders Coalition of Tennessee (EDCT) and Co-founder of the Oklahoma Eating Disorders Association (OEDA). He is a Certified Eating Disorders Specialist and training supervisor by the International Association of Eating Disorders Professionals.

Dr. Bermudez has lectured nationally and internationally on eating pathology across the lifespan, obesity, and other topics related to pediatric and adult healthcare. He has been repeatedly recognized for his dedication, advocacy, professional achievement and clinical excellence in the field of eating disorders.

Location:  The office of Dr. Lauren Muhlheim (4929 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 245, Los Angeles) – free parking in the lot (enter on Highland)

RSVP to:  drmuhlheim@gmail.com

March and April SIG meetings are open to all professionals.   During other months SIG meetings are open to all LACPA members.  Nonmembers wishing to attend may join LACPA by visiting our website www.lapsych.org

Who Gets Treated for Eating Disorders in Los Angeles?

low cost eating disorder treatment Los Angeles County This NEDAwareness week, I’ve been thinking a lot about the theme of “Let’s Get Real.” One stubborn myth about eating disorders is that they affect primarily white, upper-middle-class females.

It would take you just one afternoon at my own Los Angeles practice to discover how untrue this is. My clients are all genders, ages, and ethnicities. I accept some private insurance and one public insurance. Among my patients with eating disorders are non-native English speakers, immigrants from low SES backgrounds, and people on public assistance.

The myth that eating disorders affect only the wealthy not only makes it more difficult for patients who don’t meet the stereotype to recognize that they have a problem but affects the entire system of treatment.

Throughout the US, there is a shortage of publicly funded specialized treatment programs for eating disorders. And specialized eating disorder treatment is expensive! The residential treatment complex only serves the economically privileged.

Carolyn Becker, Ph.D. recently brought attention to the presence of eating disorders in food insecure populations. The research on which she collaborated studied adults receiving food at San Antonio area food banks. Those who had hungry children in their households (representing higher levels of food insecurity) had higher levels of binge eating, dietary restraint, weight self-stigma, worry, and overall ED pathology when compared to participants with lower levels of food insecurity

Within Los Angeles County, eating disorders are a covered diagnosis by the Department of Mental Health (DMH). However, according to a DMH district chief, there are no specialized services for eating disorders within the DMH system. I recently led a training on eating disorders at one of the county community mental health centers and a staff member there told me, “Most patients with eating disorders are seen in primary care and none of us are trained specifically in this… What we need is training in evidence-based treatment.”

A clinical staff member at another DMH clinic said, “Honestly, we don’t have a lot of access to resources for people with eating disorders and aren’t equipped to adequately handle serious cases at this clinic. Referrals have always been difficult and there are no reliable referral sources for our patient population. We have really only been able to connect a few of our most severe cases to any treatment at all.”

I searched the Alliance for Eating Disorder Awareness list of Medicare/Medicaid providers and facilities within 50 miles of Los Angeles and came up with only one Medicare provider and no Medicaid providers or facilities.

This blog post was inspired because as a provider for Anthem Medi-Cal, I am receiving calls from county clinics with referrals of other (non-Anthem) Medi-Cal patients with eating disorders that I can’t see. So, when faced with a patient with an eating disorder and no insurance in LA County, what’s a provider to do?  Here’s what I’ve been able to find. If you have other resources, I’d love to hear about them!

Resources

Hospitals

CHLA takes California Medicaid for patients under age 25 needing medical stabilization.

UCLA takes California Medicaid for patients under age 25 needing hospitalization for eating disorders.

General low-fee counseling centers

Southern California Counseling Center

Maple Counseling Center

The Wright Institute

Cal Lutheran Low Fee Counseling Center

Treatment Scholarships

Center for Discovery and Project Heal provide treatment scholarships.

Source

Becker, Carolyn Black, Keesha Middlemass, Brigitte Taylor, Clara Johnson, and Francesca Gomez. 2017. “Food Insecurity and Eating Disorder Pathology.” International Journal of Eating Disorders 50 (9): 1031–40. https://doi.org/10.1002/eat.22735.

 

Thanks to Rosewood Center Santa Monica for help with the referral list.

A Viewing Guide for “To The Bone”

Ten Things I Want Viewers of To the Bone to Know

Eating Disorder Film Guide“To The Bone,” Marti Noxon’s semi-autobiographical film about her experience as a young adult living with anorexia, was released today on Netflix and has already stirred up much controversy within the eating disorder community. As a general rule, I do not see things in black and white. As with anything, I see this film in shades of grey – it handles some things well and some things poorly. Many concerns have already been aired widely in both mainstream and social media.  Foremost among these concerns is the movie’s reinforcement of the anorexia nervosa stereotype by portraying an emaciated white female and the weight loss that lead actress Lily Collins underwent to play the role. I will not rehash these here; instead, I hope to shed light on some other important issues and to provide an educational piece to accompany the film.

  1. This film may be triggering. It shows images of severe emaciation and may either be upsetting to those vulnerable to eating disorders, or inspire a competitive desire to be “as skinny”. Often, people with eating disorders don’t feel “sick enough”; anorexia nervosa can be a competitive illness. (Reports are that pro-ana sites are already using images of Lily from the film. While it’s concerning that the film adds to the available library of these sorts of images, this library is already huge – if they didn’t use this image, it would be easy to find another.) Those susceptible must exercise caution when viewing this film and if they are triggered, they should contact their treatment team or contact an organization such as the National Eating Disorders Association for help.
  2. It is difficult to make a film that accurately portrays eating disorders. To depict eating disorders on film, behaviors must be shown. Yet much of the suffering from an eating disorder is internal and harder to depict. This film is not an educational film – it is a piece of entertainment. Nevertheless, I think it does bring eating disorders into the mainstream. The film portrays some things accurately – with others it takes great liberties. Even with these departures, I do think it has virtues that can do some good. I will discuss these more below.
  3. This is one person’s story. Marti Noxon’s aim is to tell her story and she has a right to do so. She has been public that many years ago she suffered from an eating disorder and wanted to both shed light on and draw more attention to the issue. And that she has done! Based on the talkback I attended with Marti Noxon and actors Lily Collins and Alex Sharp, Marti recognizes that she can neither represent the diversity of all people with eating disorders nor speak for the range of people affected. She hopes that her work will open the door for others to tell their own stories, a hope I share. For those interested in a more diverse story about eating disorders, check out the work of Tchaiko Omwale, who is working to complete her film Solace. If you are committed to helping bring more diverse voices forward, you can contribute to help her complete her film.
  4. To The Bone accurately portrays some of the aspects of living with an eating disorder. I do not believe the film overly glamorizes anorexia. It illustrates the mindset and some of the mental anguish of someone with an eating disorder. The film displays a number of common eating disorder behaviors. We see Ellen and her peers engaging in behaviors such as calorie-counting, dietary restriction, overexercise, bingeing and purging, and chewing and spitting. Chewing and spitting is displayed in a restaurant scene in which Ellen goes out to eat with Lucas, her friend from treatment. Chewing and spitting is a lesser-known, but significant eating disorder behavior that is not commonly talked about or assessed by professionals. It is a frequently associated with more severe eating disorder symptoms and suicidal ideation. However, the behavior is more likely to occur in private than in public. It can occur in the context of anorexia nervosa as well as bulimia nervosa or other disorders.
  1. Eating disorders are serious mental illnesses and can be life-threatening. The movie shows Ellen and some of her peers needing medical attention and carefully balances showing the gravity of their situation with building hope for recovery.
  2. To the Bone paints a very Hollywood picture of recovery. While the movie adequately portrays Ellen’s ambivalence about treatment, it implies that things shift when Ellen “decides” she wants to recover. It disturbs me greatly that Dr. Beckham tells Ellen, “I’m not going to treat you if you aren’t interested in living.” Many people with anorexia nervosa have anosognosia, a symptom that causes patients to deny their illness and refuse treatment as a result. We now know that enough food, weight gain, and a cessation of eating disorder behaviors are prerequisites for recovery from anorexia nervosa. Usually some physical restoration is required before a patient can really want to recover – Dr. Ovidio Bermudez calls this a “brain rescue.”
  3. The movie does not model modern eating disorder treatment practices. But realistic treatment would probably not make a good Hollywood story. For starters, I would never suggest a therapy patient change his/her name! More seriously, in eating disorder treatment we prioritize nutritional recovery. This refers not to specific nutrients, but to the development of healthy eating habits including regular meals and adequate amounts of food. This applies to people with all eating disorders, not just anorexia nervosa. People with eating disorders need as a primary element of treatment food – balanced, sufficient, and regular eating. The movie portrays the patients in the residential treatment center as each able to choose their own food. While some patients eat some portion of the meals served, other patients eat nothing (or the one character with BED repeatedly eats only peanut butter out of the jar). I know of no treatment setting that would not have a primary focus on structured regular meals and patients having requirements for meals that can become less restrictive as they progress in treatment.
  4. I worry that the portrayal of Ellen’s family reinforces old myths about eating disorders being caused by families. To reiterate, families do not cause eating disorders. Ellen’s father is unavailable (and never even appears), her mother has had mental health problems (and is involved in a new relationship) and no one is really there for Ellen, except her stepmother who takes her to treatment and her half-sister. I do love the portrayal of the relationship between Ellen and her half-sister. I think this relationship captures the mixture of love, concern, and anger experienced by siblings.
  5. The movie misses the opportunity to depict the family as important allies in treatment. No one is really involved in Ellen’s treatment beyond the family session, and Dr. Beckham states there is no need for any future family sessions on the basis of how badly it went. None of the young people in this house have their parents involved in their treatment (at least that we see). This is very unrealistic in this day and age. Almost every treatment center involves family members to a greater or lesser degree. In reality, parents can play a central role in the treatment of adolescents and young adults, are usually included in treatment, and can even drive the treatment when their youngsters are incapable of seeking treatment on their own or have anosognosia. Parents can also help with nourishing their youngsters back to health (but not in the dramatic way it was portrayed in the film…with a baby bottle). Family-based treatment (also referred to as the Maudsley method and mentioned in passing in the scene where the moms are in the waiting room waiting for their daughters to have an intake with Dr. Beckham as something they have tried) is actually the leading treatment for adolescents and is also effective for many young adults. It focuses on empowering the family to be an important part of the treatment team and able to fight for recovery on behalf of an unwilling or unmotivated youngster and also provide meal support.
  1. Three Things I really like about the film:
    1. I love that Dr. Beckham says, “There is never one cause.” This is true.
    2. I love that it builds hope for recovery by showing Lucas as doing well and actively working on recovery.
    3. I love that it shows a male and an African-American with eating disorders.

Although I was a consultant for the film, I had no influence on the story.

In conclusion, please View the Nine Truths PSA the cast and crew of To the Bone produced for World Eating Disorders Action Day. While aspects of the film veer far from reality, the filmmakers are committed to the cause and, to support eating disorder education, they made this PSA which aligns with the best current evidence on eating disorders. Most of the messages I would want viewers of the film to come away with would be covered in this fabulous video. You can also read the Nine Truths About Eating Disorders:

Truth #1: Many people with eating disorders look healthy, yet may be extremely ill.

Truth #2: Families are not to blame, and can be the patients’ and providers’ best allies in treatment.

Truth #3: An eating disorder diagnosis is a health crisis that disrupts personal and family functioning.

Truth #4: Eating disorders are not choices, but serious biologically influenced illnesses.

Truth #5: Eating disorders affect people of all genders, ages, races, ethnicities, body shapes and weights, sexual orientations, and socioeconomic statuses.

Truth #6: Eating disorders carry an increased risk for both suicide and medical complications.

Truth #7: Genes and environment play important roles in the development of eating disorders.

Truth #8: Genes alone do not predict who will develop eating disorders.

Truth #9: Full recovery from an eating disorder is possible. Early detection and intervention are important.

Produced in collaboration with Dr. Cynthia Bulik, PhD, FAED, who serves as distinguished Professor of Eating Disorders in the School of Medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Professor of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden. “Nine Truths” is based on Dr. Bulik’s 2014 “9 Eating Disorders Myths Busted” talk at the National Institute of Mental Health Alliance for Research Progress meeting.

A More Diverse Eating Disorder Film

Eating Disorder film Tchaiko Omawale
with Tchaiko

In the wake of the premiere on Netflix of another eating disorder film, my friend, JD Ouellette, reminded me that the frustration over another stereotypical narrative about eating disorders could provide an opportunity. At the NEDA Conference in 2014, both JD and I (as well as many other attendees) were impressed by Tchaiko Omawale’s sharing of her inspiring story of recovery on the Friends and Family Panel. Later, we learned about her work (writing, directing, and producing) on Solace, a coming of age feature film inspired by Tchaiko’s journey with an eating disorder and self-harm. In April, I had the opportunity to attend a fundraiser for Solace and preview a scene. I spoke about the need for more films, stories, and images of people from diverse backgrounds with eating disorders, reading some parts of this article.

Eating Disorder film presentation
Speaking at the fundraiser

As summarized in Truth #5 of the collaborative consensus document, the Nine Truths, “Eating disorders affect people of all genders, ages, races, ethnicities, body shapes and weights, sexual orientations, and socioeconomic statuses.” When I work with people of diverse backgrounds, they consistently tell me they are frustrated that mainstream eating disorder narratives do not portray people who resemble them. Not only the popular media — television, film, print articles, online publications — but even the marketing materials of many eating disorder treatment centers continue to depict eating disorder sufferers mostly as the common stereotype: female, white, and thin.

To those interested in supporting a film that doesn’t reinforce stereotypes, Tchaiko Omawale has made such a film. She needs additional funding to complete the film, which is in post-production. Visit Solace Film page to learn more and, if you are so inclined, join me in supporting this important project. She has a donation page.

Eating Disorder film Tchaiko Omawale and cast
Tchaiko speaking with cast members on her right

LACPA Eating Disorder SIG

LACPA Eating Disorder SIGThe Eating Disorder SIG (EDSIG) is an active group of Los Angeles County Psychological Association (LACPA) professionals interested in eating disorders, body image, and related issues. The group, founded in 2012,  by Stacey Rosenfeld, Ph.D., is now led by Lauren Muhlheim, Psy.D. Through presentations and discussion, the EDSIG helps LACPA members explore the field of eating disorders and provides them support as they interact with eating-disordered clients, families, and the community.  

To date, the EDSIG has attracted national-level speakers as guests, including Dr. Abigail Saguy (author of What’s Wrong with Fat?), Stephanie Covington Armstrong (author of Not All Black Girls Know How to Eat), and Lisa Kantor, JD, an attorney who won the first published eating disorder decision in California, as well the first federal court ruling that mandated insurance companies to pay for medically necessary treatment for mental illnesses. Other speakers include: Dr. Kathleen Kara Fitzpatrick (Clinical Assistant Professor at Stanford University), Aimee Liu (author of several novels as well as Gaining: The Truth of Life After Eating Disorders and Restoring Our Bodies, Reclaiming Our Lives: Guidance and Reflections on Recovering from Eating Disorders), Ragen Chastain (a thought leader in the fat acceptance movement), Dr. Richard Achiro (author of a recent study on over-the-counter workout supplement use in gym-active men that received international recognition from several news sources), Pia Guerrero, founder of Adios Barbie and body image activist, Dagan VanDemark, founder and policy director of Trans Folx Fighting Eating Disorders, TFFED), Dr. Stephanie Knatz Peck (program director for the Intensive Family Treatment Programs at the UCSD Eating Disorders Treatment and Research Center), Jessica Raymond, founder and director of Recovery Warriors and Rise Up + Recover app.

Equally qualified and exciting speakers have already committed to speaking to our group in the coming year, so watch the listserv for details. EDSIG Meetings are geared toward eating-disorder specialists but many talks are likely to be of interest to the more general psychological community. Meetings are held every 1-2 months, typically on a weekday evening, in the Hollywood area. Events are posted on the LACPA calendar and sent out to the email listserv. For questions or to recommend a speaker or request a topic,  Dr. Muhlheim at drmuhlheim@gmail.com.

SIG meetings are open to all LACPA members. Non-members wishing to attend may join LACPA by visiting our website www.lapsych.org.

For a complete list of topics and speakers to date, see below:

2012

  • January 2012: Introduction to group and topic discussion
  • February 2012: Intuitive Eating — Brooke Glazer, RD
  • March 2012: Psychopharmacological Treatment of EDs — Hope Levin, MD
  • May 2012: Overview of FBT — Lauren Muhlheim, PsyD
  • July 2012: Current Topics in EDs
  • October 2012: The One-Hour Medical School — Linda Schack, MD

2013

  • January 2013: Viewing of the film, Someday Melissa
  • April 2013: What’s Wrong with Fat? — Abigail Saguy, PhD
  • June 2013: Difficulties in the Treatment of Overweight Eating Disorder Patients – Swimming Against the Current — Wendy Rosenstein, MD
  • October 2013: Yoga, Feminism, & Body Image — Melanie Klein, MA

2014

  • February 2014:  Eating Disorders Affect us All: Eating Disorders in Diverse Populations — Stephanie Covington Armstrong
  • March 2014: Yoga, Body Image, and Eating Disorders — Chelsea Roff
  • April 2014: Working with Insurance Companies to Obtain Coverage — Lisa Kantor, JD
  • June 2014: Intuitive Eating with BED — Aaron Flores, RDN
  • August 2014: Does Every Woman Have an Eating Disorder? – Stacey Rosenfeld, Ph.D.
  • September 2014: Pregnancy and Eating Disorders – Maggie Baumann, MFT, CEDS
  • October 2014: Transgender Issues and Eating Disorders – Dagan VanDeMark
  • December 2014: The Stages of Recovery – Aimee Liu

2015

  • February 2015: Adios Barbie: Body Image, Intersectionality, Healing and Advocacy – Pia Guerrero
  • March 2015: B.E.A.U.T.Y: Paint Me A Soul — Nikki DuBose
  • April 2015: Temperament, neurobiology, and implications for adult eating disorder treatment — Stephanie Knatz, Ph.D.
  • May 2015: Misophonia – Jaeline Jaffe
  • June 2015 – Modernizing Recovery Resources for the Millennial Generation– Jessica Raymond
  • July 2015: Advocacy and the Eating Disorder World:  Why Clinicians Matter– Kathleen MacDonald
  • August 2015: Shift Happens: Cognitive development, flexibility and remediation in eating disorders– Kara Fitzpatrick, Ph.D.
  • September 2015: Full Metal Apron: Fighting Eating Disorders from the Kitchen Table — JD Ouellette
  • November 2015: Medico-Legal Aspects of Eating Disorders Treatment Including Denial of Care — David Rudnick, MD
  • December 2015: When Fit Becomes Foe: Excessive Workout Supplement Use as an Emerging Eating Disorder in Men — Richard Achiro, Ph.D.

2016

  • January 2016: Elimination is Oppression: The Ill-Advised War Against Obesity– Ragen Chastain
  • January 2016: Unraveling the Enigma of Male Eating Disorders (CE event) — Stuart Murray, Ph.D.
  • March 2016: When OCD and Eating Disorders Collide: Assessment and Treatment Planning for OCD and co-existing Eating Disorders – Kimberly Quinlan, LMFT
  • April 2016: Medical Complications in Eating Disorder Treatment – Lyn Goldring, RN
  • May 2016: Dieting, stress, and weight stigma – Janet Tomiyama, Ph.D.
  • July 2016: It’s All Relative: Eating Disorders and Genetics – Stephanie Zerwas, Ph.D.
  • November 2016:  DBT for Eating Disorders – Charlotte Thomas, LCSW
  • November 2016: in conjunction with the Couples SIG – Panel Discussion: The Impact of Particular Addictive/Compulsive Behaviors on a Couple’s Relationship, and How to Help – Hoarding, Gambling, and Eating Disorders– Regina F. Lark, PhD, Cristin Runfola, PhD, and Margaret Altschul, MBA, MA, LMFT
  • December 2016: The Healing Power of the Paw: How Animals Can Play a Vital Role in Eating Disorder Recovery — Shannon Kopp

2017

  • January 2017: The Dangers of Dieting – Glenys Oston, RDN
  • February 2017: When an Athlete Gets an Eating Disorder – Abby McCrea, LMFT (in conjunction with the Sports and Performance Psychology SIG)
  • March 2017: Thinking Critically and Cautiously About the Phrase “Eating Disorders Are Biologically-Based Mental Illnesses – Michael Levine, Ph.D., FAED
  • April 2017: Medical Complications of Eating Disorders – Margherita Mascolo, MD
  • September 2017: Psychopharmacological Treatment of Eating Disorders – Hope Levin, MD
  • October 2017: Media and Body Image: How Media Literacy Can Help Counteract Unrealistic Body Ideals – Bobbi Eisenstock, Ph.D.
  • December 2017: Body Image in Anorexia Nervosa and Body Dysmorphic Disorder: Clinical and Neurobiological Features –  Jamie Feusner, MD

2018

  • January 2018: Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder: Assessment, neurobiology, and treatment –  Jennifer Thomas, Ph.D.
  • April 2018: Understanding Brain Development in the Treatment of Eating Disorders – Ovidio Bermudez, MD
  • May 2018: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Eating Disorders: What’s the Connection? – Gretchen Kubacky, Psy.D.
  • July 2018: Men Struggle, Too: My Journey with Binge Eating Disorder – Ryan Sheldon
  • December 2018: Eating Disorders and the Impact on Siblings – Kym Piekunka

2019

  • February 2019: Weight Stigma and Disordered Eating: A Multi-Method Approach –  Jeffrey Hunger, PhD
  • April 2019:  Historical Trauma and Modern Day Oppression: How Does This Relate to Eating Disorders? –  Gloria Lucas
  • May 2019: Mindfulness-Based Eating Awareness Training (MB-EAT): Research and Clinical Application –  Sheila Forman, PhD (with the Mindfulness and Spirituality SIG)

LACPA Eating Disorder SIGLACPA Eating Disorder SIG

OCD and Eating Disorders – LACPA ED SIG Event – March 2016

It’s the time of year when the Los Angeles County Psychological Association SIG events are open to nonmenbers.  So, come try it out.  Details on our next event are as follows:

Thursday, March 3 at 7:30 PM

Presenter: Kimberley Quinlan, LMFT

Title: When OCD and Eating Disorders Collide: Assessment and Treatment Planning for OCD and co-existing Eating Disorders 

Description: Managing Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and a co-existing eating disorder can be quite difficult and require significant attention and prioritizing. A very important goal is to ensure that improvements in the symptomology in one disorder are not due to an increase in compulsivity in another co-existing disorder.

During this presentation, Kimberley will discuss at length how to identify and assess for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder symptoms and how to then prioritize treatment goals and tools in these cases. Participants will learn how to manage clinical time with clients, specifically when their eating disorder has become a part of their OCD compulsions.

Attendees will learn important differentiations between general OCD, OCD food-related obsessions (including Symmetry obsessions and Orthorexia) and Eating Disorder obsessions.   Attendees will learn how to prioritize treatment goals and planning (specifically targeting the use Exposure and Response Prevention and other evidence based treatment tools) when managing OCD and co-existing Eating Disorders. Attendees will also be offered a Q&A for general questions.

Location:  The office of Dr. Lauren Muhlheim (4929 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 245, Los Angeles) – free parking in the lot (enter on Highland)

Bio:

KIMBERLEY QUINLAN is a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist in the State of California. During her training and education, Kimberley dedicated much of her research to the study of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for the treatment of Anxiety Disorders and Eating Disorders.

Kimberley did her internship at the OCD Center of Los Angeles and went on to become the Clinical Director of the OCD Center of Los Angeles. Kimberley currently has a private practice in Calabasas, California. Kimberley provides weekly outpatient, intensive outpatient services, in addition to 2-day Mindfulness Workshops, for those with OCD, Body Focused Repetitive Behaviors’s and other OCD spectrum disorders.

Kimberley has been featured in many world known media outlets, such as LA Times, Wall Street Journal, KCRW public radio, and the Seattle Times, discussing co-existing OCD and eating disorders. Kimberley has also consulted on various mental health issues with programs such as ABC’s 20/20 and Telemundo.

RSVP to:  drmuhlheim@gmail.com

March and April SIG meetings are open to all professionals.  During other months SIG meetings are open to all LACPA members. Nonmembers wishing to attend may join LACPA by visiting our website www.lapsych.org

Fall 2014 LACPA Eating Disorder SIG events

The Los Angeles County Psychological Association Eating Disorder SIG is kicking off the membership year with 2 great events.  Join LACPA now to take advantage of these and other events. 

1)  Date:  Thursday, October 23

Time:  7- 8:30 pm

Presenter:  Dagan VanDemark

T-FFED
T-Ffed: Trans Folx Fighting Eating Disorders

Title: TRANSforming Eating Disorder Recovery: Deconstructing the Overrepresentation of Eating Disorders in Trans and Gender Diverse Individuals, and How Healthcare Professionals Can Better Serve Our Communities

While under-treated and still under-researched, preliminary studies and countless anecdotes demonstrate that transgender people suffer from eating disorders disproportionately. This workshop will introduce how trans and gender-diverse people are vulnerable to and struggle with EDs, and conduct a basic training for health professionals looking to offer more trans-friendly, gender-literate and accessible care.  

Location:  The office of Dr. Lauren Muhlheim (4929 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 245, Los Angeles)

Bio:  Dagan VanDemark is the Founder and Executive Director of the pending non-profit T-FFED: Trans Folx Fighting Eating Disorders, based in LA but quickly gaining national reach. Dagan, a genderqueer trans boi, battled bulimia/EDNOS for fifteen years. They have a B.A. in Gender Studies from CSULB, a certificate in Grant Writing and Administration from CSUDH, and they are enrolled in both the Non-Profit Management certificate program at UCLA and a transgender leadership initiative through Gender Justice LA. They speak on university panels about gender variance and sexual diversity, and write/blog extensively about transgender communities’ experiences with eating disorders.

Aimee Liu
Aimee Liu

2)  Date:  Wednesday, December 3

Time:  7:15 – 8:45 pm

Presenter:  Aimee Liu

Title: The Stages of Recovery 

Location:  The office of Dr. Lauren Muhlheim (4929 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 245, Los Angeles)

Bio:  Aimee Liu is the author of Restoring Our Bodies, Reclaiming Our Lives (Trumpeter Books, 2011), a benefit project for the Academy for Eating Disorders, and of Gaining: The Truth About Life After Eating Disorders (Wellness Central, 2007), a sequel to her acclaimed 1979 memoir Solitaire.  Her novels include Flash House (Warner Books, 2003), Cloud Mountain (Warner Books, 1997), and Face (Warner Books, 1994).  She also has co-authored more than seven nonfiction books and written numerous articles on medical, psychological, and political topics. She earned her MFA from Bennington College and now teaches in Goddard College’s  MFA in Creative Writing Program. 

More information is available at www.gainingthetruth.com

Please RSVP to drmuhlheim@gmail.com (2 H’s in Muhlheim)

SIG meetings are open to all LACPA members. Nonmembers wishing to attend may join LACPA by visiting our website www.lapsych.org

Psychological assistant providing low cost treatment for eating disorders

I remain committed to the practice of and dissemination of evidence-based treatments. To that end, I am excited to announce that I have added a registered psychological assistant to my practice in Los Angeles:

Liliana Almeida, M.A, Clinical Psychology Ph.D. Student, PSB-94020579 is no longer with the practice, but we do have a new therapist in training who provides low-cost therapy to patients with eating disorders in Spanish, English, and Portuguese. Learn more about Eliane Spagnoletto, ACSW.

Liliana Almeida, M.A.
Liliana Almeida, M.A.

 

Liliana Almeida, M.A., is a fourth year Clinical Psychology Ph.D. student at the California School of Professional Psychology at Alliant International University in Los Angeles. She received her M.A. from The New School and her B.A. from Rutgers University. During the last 7 years she has researched eating disorders and obesity. Her clinical experience includes working with diverse clients in a community mental health center providing cognitive-behavioral and psychodynamic psychotherapy in English and Spanish.

Liliana will be working under my supervision and is available to work with adult and adolescent clients with eating disorders, anxiety, and depression.  She will provide services in English, Spanish, and Portuguese and will be able to provide some low-cost therapy to those in need.

Portuguese

Eu sou uma assistente de psicologia (PBS-94020579) para Lauren Muhlheim, Psy.D., psicóloga clínica especializada no tratamento cognitivo-comportamental de perturbações alimentares. Como assistente de psicologia, eu forneço psicoterapia cognitivo-compartamental em Português sob a licença da Dra. Muhlheim (PSY 15045) para adolescentes e adultos que sofrem com depressão, ansiedade e pertubações de o comportamento alimentar.

Spanish

Soy una asistente de psicología (PBS-94020579) para Lauren Muhlheim, Psy.D., una psicóloga clínica especializada en el tratamiento cognitivo-conductal de los trastornos alimentarios. Como asistente de psicología yo proveo terapia cognitivo-conductal en Español bajo la supervision y licencia de la Dra. Muhlheim (PSY 15045) para adolescentes y adultos que sufren de la depresión, ansiedad y de los trastornos de la conducta alimentaria.

 

Free fitness Hollywood/miracle mile area

I commonly see patients in my psychology practice for depression, anxiety, and other emotional complaints. When I’m taking someone’s history, there’s one question I always ask which may surprise you:
“Tell me how often you exercise.”

The benefits of exercise are enormous and well documented: exercise invigorates, improves mood, reduces anxiety and stress, boosts self-esteem, and improves focus and concentration.

Many of my clients who are new to Los Angeles struggle to develop an exercise regimen here. Many feel overwhelmed and don’t feel they have the time. If this is the issue, change your perspective: exercise isn’t adding to your problem – it’s part of the solution. Exercise is one of the simplest, least expensive ways to manage stress and maintain life balance. With a little creativity, you can build exercise into your routine here.

Sometimes cost is an issue. If running in the great LA weather doesn’t appeal and joining a gym in the Hollywood area is too expensive, there are still numerous opportunities for free and FUN fitness in the area. All of these offer the opportunity to meet people as well.
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