Family-Based Treatment Can Help Depression and Self-Esteem Too!

FBT Depression and Self-Esteem [image description: silhouette of a child with arms out in a field]

Family-based treatment (FBT) is a relatively new evidence-based treatment for adolescent eating disorders. It represents a paradigm shift from older treatments that focused on helping adolescents become independent from parents in order to recover from their eating disorder. In FBT, parents are central members of the treatment team and they are charged with guiding and changing their adolescent’s eating disorder behaviors. In FBT, the therapist meets weekly with the entire family, spending only about 5 minutes alone with the adolescent at the start of each session. It is designed as a standalone treatment. The adolescent is also followed by a medical doctor, but does not have additional appointments with a therapist or a dietitian.

Symptoms of depression and low self-esteem are common in adolescents with bulimia nervosa. One of the many concerns that I hear from parents considering Family-Based Treatment (FBT) for their child with anorexia or bulimia is that FBT won’t address other symptoms the child may have like depression or anxiety. Furthermore, families who are receiving FBT often feel pressured to add additional treatments such as individual psychotherapy for their adolescents to address these other issues. Even other non-FBT clinicians continue to be incredulous that adolescents can improve without other treatment. Fortunately, Cara Bohon, Ph.D. and colleagues at Stanford University recently published a paper that addresses this concern for adolescents with bulimia nervosa.

In their study, 110 adolescents with bulimia nervosa from two sites were randomly assigned to receive either individual Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for adolescents or FBT. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT), which is the most successful treatment for adults with eating disorders, focuses on understanding the factors maintaining the bulimia symptoms and developing strategies to challenge problematic thoughts and change behaviors. The therapist meets weekly with the adolescent. The two treatments are of comparable lengths.

Results showed that both FBT and CBT significantly reduced symptoms of depression and improved self-esteem. Previous papers suggest that abstinence from eating disorder symptoms occurs faster in FBT when compared with CBT for adolescents with bulimia nervosa. Thus, FBT may be a better option in many cases.

It is important to dispel parents’ fears that FBT will not adequately address depression and self-esteem. The authors state in the paper, “This concern can subsequently steer families away from an evidence‐supported approach in favor of therapies that may not be as successful in reducing binge eating and purging.”

In fact, the researchers point out that it may be that the cycles of binge eating and purging of bulimia serve to maintain depressive symptoms and poor self-esteem. Thus, one may not need a treatment that directly targets depression.

Dr. Bohon stated, “The reason we conducted this study is because comorbid depression is the norm with bulimia nervosa, and it was important to establish that you don’t automatically need any extra treatment to see improvement in the context of FBT. Obviously, if someone is still struggling after completing FBT, a referral for CBT for depression or another evidence-based treatment would be important, but it is likely not needed for most individuals.”

Source

Valenzuela, Fabiola, James Lock, Daniel Le Grange, and Cara Bohon. 2018. “Comorbid Depressive Symptoms and Self-Esteem Improve after Either Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy or Family-Based Treatment for Adolescent Bulimia Nervosa.” European Eating Disorders Review: The Journal of the Eating Disorders Association26 (3): 253–58. https://doi.org/10.1002/erv.2582.

A More Diverse Eating Disorder Film

Eating Disorder film Tchaiko Omawale [image description: photo of me and Tchaiko Omawale]
with Tchaiko

In the wake of the premiere on Netflix of another eating disorder film, my friend, JD Ouellette, reminded me that the frustration over another stereotypical narrative about eating disorders could provide an opportunity. At the NEDA Conference in 2014, both JD and I (as well as many other attendees) were impressed by Tchaiko Omawale’s sharing of her inspiring story of recovery on the Friends and Family Panel. Later, we learned about her work (writing, directing, and producing) on Solace, a coming of age feature film inspired by Tchaiko’s journey with an eating disorder and self-harm. In April, I had the opportunity to attend a fundraiser for Solace and preview a scene. I spoke about the need for more films, stories, and images of people from diverse backgrounds with eating disorders, reading some parts of this article.

Eating Disorder film presentation [image description: photo of me speaking at the event]
Speaking at the fundraiser
As summarized in Truth #5 of the collaborative consensus document, the Nine Truths, “Eating disorders affect people of all genders, ages, races, ethnicities, body shapes and weights, sexual orientations, and socioeconomic statuses.” When I work with people of diverse backgrounds, they consistently tell me they are frustrated that mainstream eating disorder narratives do not portray people who resemble them. Not only the popular media — television, film, print articles, online publications — but even the marketing materials of many eating disorder treatment centers continue to depict eating disorder sufferers mostly as the common stereotype: female, white, and thin.

To those interested in supporting a film that doesn’t reinforce stereotypes, Tchaiko Omawale has made such a film. She needs additional funding to complete the film, which is in post-production. Visit Solace Film page to learn more and, if you are so inclined, join me in supporting this important project. She has a donation page.

Eating Disorder film Tchaiko Omawale and cast [image description: Tchaiko Omawale and the cast]
Tchaiko speaking with cast members on her right

2017 Spring LACPA Eating Disorder SIG Open (to non-LACPA members) events

Michael Levine, Ph.D., FAED [image description: photo of Michael Levine]Date: Tuesday, March 7 at 7:30 pm.

Title: Thinking Critically and Cautiously About the Phrase “Eating Disorders Are Biologically-Based Mental Illnesses

Presenter:  Michael Levine, Ph.D., FAED

Description: It has become a foundational “truth” among many clinicians, researchers, patients, family members, and advocates that, in accordance with the 2009 position statement of the Academy for Eating Disorders (AED), eating disorders are “biologically-based mental illnesses.” In fact, number 4 of the AED’s “Nine Truths about Eating Disorders” is “Eating disorders are not choices, but serious biologically influenced illnesses.”

Dr. Michael Levine has for many years studied sociocultural factors and their relationship to the prevention of eating disorders and disordered eating. In this talk, Levine offers a critical evaluation of this contention, in so far as one meaning of “critical” is “exercising or involving careful judgment or judicious evaluation” (Mirriam-Webster On-Line Dictionary; www.m-w.com).

Levine begins by addressing important general concepts, such as “illness” and “biologically-based,” as well as “scientific,” “evidence-based,” and “risk factor.” This sets the stage for a description of the Biopsychiatric/Neuroscientific paradigm in the eating disorders field. He will then consider the evidence for “biological causes” in the development of eating disorders, and its implications for two important challenges in the field: prevention and talking with patients, families, and the media. Throughout his presentation, Levine will compare and contrast the Biopsychiatric/Neuroscientific paradigm with the Sociocultural paradigm. Thus, his concluding remarks will consider what if anything is gained (and/or lost) by applying phrases such as “biopsychosocial” and “gene-environment interactions.”

Bio: Michael P. Levine, Ph.D., is Emeritus Professor of Psychology at Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio, where he taught 33 years (1979-2012). In the field of eating disorders, his commitment to research, writing, and activism focuses on the intersection between sociocultural risk factors, prevention, community psychology, and developmental psychology. He has authored two books and three prevention curriculum guides, and he has co-edited three books on prevention. In August 2015, as co-editor with his long-time collaborator and colleague Dr. Linda Smolak, he published a two-volume Handbook of Eating Disorders (Wiley & Sons Publishing). He and Dr. Smolak are currently working on a second, updated edition of their 2006 book The Prevention of Eating Problems and Eating Disorders (Erlbaum/Routledge/Taylor & Francis). In addition, he has authored or co-authored approximately 110 articles and book chapters, and he has presented his work throughout the United States, as well as in Canada, England, Spain, Austria, and Australia. He is a member of the advisory councils of The National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA), the Center for Study of Anorexia and Bulimia (CSAB, NY), the Center for Balanced Living (CBL, Columbus, Ohio) and Monte Nido & Affiliates—Eating Disorder Treatment Centers.

Dr. Levine is a Fellow of the Academy for Eating Disorders (AED), which has awarded him their Meehan-Hartley Award for Leadership in Public Awareness and Advocacy (2006), and their Research-Practice Partnership Award (2008). Dr. Levine is also a member of the Founders Council of the National Eating Disorders Association, which awarded him the Lori Irving Award for Excellence in Eating Disorders Prevention and Awareness (2004) and the Nielsen Award for Lifetime Achievement (2013). After living for 37 years in Mount Vernon, OH, with his wife, Dr. Mary A. Suydam, a retired (as of May 2015) Kenyon religious studies and women and gender studies professor, they moved to California in late June 2016, to live near UC Santa Barbara, where they both obtained all their degrees.

Location: The office of Dr. Lauren Muhlheim (4929 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 245, Los Angeles) – free parking in the lot (enter on Highland)

RSVP to: drmuhlheim@gmail.com

March and April SIG meetings are open to all professionals.   During other months SIG meetings are open to all LACPA members.  Non-members wishing to attend may join LACPA by visiting our website www.lapsych.org


Date: Thursday, April 20 at 7:30 pm.

Title: Medical Complications of Eating Disorders

Presenter:  Margherita Mascolo, MD, ACUTE Medical Director

Description:  Dr. Mascolo is the medical director of ACUTE. She will discuss the medical complications of severe restricting as well as purging. The presentation will include a broad review of the pathophysiology of starvation as well as the organ systems affected. There will be case-based discussion and presentation based on real patients seen on the ACUTE unit. Target audience is mental health professionals, dietitians, and allied professionals who need a broad understanding of the medical complications of restricting and purging.

Bio: Dr. Mascolo is the Medical Director at the ACUTE Center for Eating Disorders at Denver Health, where she has been a member of the ACUTE team since its beginning in 2008. She has trained under Dr. Philip S. Mehler for the past 8 years to become one of the country’s leading experts in the medical care of patients with severe eating disorders and served as Associate Medical Director under Dr. Jennifer Gaudiani for the past 3 years.

Dr. Mascolo completed her undergraduate work at the University of St. Thomas in Houston, Texas and earned her medical degree at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center. She completed her residency in Internal Medicine at the University of Colorado in Denver. She is board certified in Internal Medicine, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of Colorado. Dr. Mascolo has published multiple peer-reviewed articles on the medical complications of eating disorders and is currently working to complete her Certified Eating Disorder Specialist certification.

Location: The office of Dr. Lauren Muhlheim (4929 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 245, Los Angeles) – free parking in the lot (enter on Highland)

RSVP to: drmuhlheim@gmail.com

March and April SIG meetings are open to all professionals.   During other months SIG meetings are open to all LACPA members.  Non-members wishing to attend may join LACPA by visiting our website www.lapsych.org

December 2016 LACPA Eating Disorder SIG

image description: photo of Shannon KoppDate: Wednesday, December 7 at 7:30 pm (Note: new date)

Presenter: Shannon Kopp – Author of Pound for Pound: A Story of One Woman’s Recovery and the Shelter Dogs Who Loved Her Back to Life (HarperCollins Publishers) and Founder of SoulPaws Recovery Project.

Title: The Healing Power of the Paw: How Animals Can Play a Vital Role in Eating Disorder Recovery

With the highest mortality rate of any mental illness and afflicting up to 30 million people in America, eating disorders can have heartbreaking consequences. For eight years, Shannon Kopp battled the silent, horrific, and all-too-common disease of bulimia. Despite a near decade of weekly therapy, medication, loving support from family, and a hospitalization and rehab stay at Rosewood Center for Eating Disorders, she continued to grow progressively sicker.

Then, at twenty-four, she began working with shelter dogs at the San Diego Humane Society, where she felt a deep sense of calm and comfort around the animals. Gradually over time, when Shannon wrestled with anxiety, she began turning to the loving presence of a dog (rather than to the eating disorder). A dog’s ability to live in the present moment helped to pull her out of her head and back down to earth. The dogs grounded her, and they created a vital sense of emotional security.

Shannon adopted a dog and began bringing her dog with her to therapy, and soon, Shannon was sharing on a deeper and more honest level than ever before. This marked the beginning of her eating disorder recovery—she will celebrate seven years free from bulimia on August 28th.

Research on the human-animal bond (known as Anthrozoology) has increased steadily over the years. Studies have shown that the presence of an animal may decrease stress levels by lowering blood pressure and creating a sense of general well-being—for the both human and animal!

Today, Shannon offers free animal therapy—SoulPaws Workshops— to those suffering from eating disorders in her community. (Learn More About SoulPaws Workshops Here: http://shannonkopp.com/workshops/)

Location: The office of Dr. Lauren Muhlheim (4929 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 245, Los Angeles) – free parking in the lot (enter on Highland)

Bio – Shannon Kopp is an eating disorder survivor, animal welfare advocate, and the best-selling author of Pound for Pound: A Story of One Woman’s Recovery and the Shelter Dogs Who Loved Her Back to Life (HarperCollins Publishers). She is also the founder of SoulPaws Recovery Project, offering free animal therapy to those suffering from eating disorders. Shannon’s story has been featured on CNN, Fox News, Huffington Post, Salon, NPR and more. www.shannonkopp.com

http://www.harpercollinsspeakersbureau.com/speaker/shannon-kopp/

RSVP to: drmuhlheim@gmail.com

SIG meetings are open to all LACPA members. Nonmembers wishing to attend may join LACPA by visiting our website www.lapsych.org

A most misguided device

image description: diagram of the Aspire Assist, showing tube device connecting to stomach

To the long list of desperate and dangerous weight loss products, we can now add the AspireAssist, sadly approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) this week. The device is marketed as a “minimally invasive” and “reversible” weight loss “solution” for “people with obesity.” Essentially, an aspiration tube is inserted into the patient’s stomach so that the patient can, after eating, empty the contents of their stomach into the toilet by pressing a button on the device. To critics such as me, this device sounds a lot like a bulimia machine.

The AspireAssist has been through limited research; potential negative consequences remain unknown. It represents yet another example of how larger people are stigmatized and then preyed upon by manufacturers (abetted by the US government) who reinforce the belief that their bodies are inadequate and sell them various misguided products to help them attain the thin ideal. These dangerous products range from medications (remember phen/fen?) to surgeries, and now a device to empty one’s stomach.

Dagan Vandemark, Program and Policy Coordinator of Trans Folx Fighting Eating Disorders, stated, “This is a medicalized, surgicalized imposition of bulimia on higher-weight bodies, telling folks that having an eating disorder is better than being fat.” Bariatric surgery is often touted as the solution to obesity. And yet, I have seen clients post-bariatric surgery who were no better off.

A number of compensatory behaviors, including vomiting, exercising, and laxative use, can qualify one for a diagnosis of bulimia nervosa according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5). The only difference between these behaviors and the Aspire Assist is that the latter is medically prescribed.

Psychologist Deb Burgard has eloquently made the case that the behaviors society prescribes to help large patients lose weight are those same behaviors we diagnose as an eating disorder in lower weight patients. The Aspire Assist goes one step further by mechanizing bulimia nervosa. This device has a potential for the same kinds of weight loss abuse as do laxatives and diabetes medications.

The FDA press release lists among the potential side effects of the AspireAssist “occasional indigestion, nausea, vomiting, constipation, and diarrhea.” The endoscopic surgical procedure to insert the tube includes potential problems ranging from a sore throat, bleeding, pneumonia, unintended puncture of the stomach, and death. Risks related to the stomach opening include infection and bleeding.

As someone who has treated patients with bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder for many years, this concerns me greatly. Helping clients to stop purging when it involves a behavior as unpleasant as vomiting is difficult enough. The leverage clinicians use to help people stop purging involves the individual’s own shame and disgust as well as negative health consequences. It is appalling that we now have a device that makes it easier (and permissible) for people to remove food from their stomachs.

Additionally, to help clients break a bulimia cycle, clinicians help clients employ strategies to stop restricting and purging. Bingeing is often the hardest behavior to change. Clients who continue to purge give themselves permission to engage in bigger binges. The thinking is, “Since I am going to purge anyway, I’m going to go ahead and eat more and then get rid of it.” An important intervention is for clients to remove purging as an option; this makes binges easier to modify. Outfitting clients with a no-fuss purge device will only encourage more binge eating.

Eating disorders occur commonly enough; there is a shortage of adequately trained professionals to treat the current number of patients with eating disorders. Let’s not make the problem worse by inducing eating disorders in even more patients.

We need to stop preying on and oppressing people in larger bodies and leading them to believe they are a problem to be fixed. We need to stop subjecting them to insane procedures in an effort to conform to an unnecessary standard. No treatment for obesity has been shown to work long term. We need as a society to accept that people come in all shapes and sizes.

April and May 2016 LACPA Eating Disorder SIG events

image description: Lyn GoldringPlease join us:  

Wednesday, April 20 at 7:30 PM

During April all LACPA Special Interest Groups (SIGs) and Clubs are available to non-members as a way of introducing them to some of the many FREE benefits of LACPA membership.

Presenter:  Lyn Goldring, RN, Director of Nursing, Monte Nido and Affiliates

Title:  Medical Complications in Eating Disorder Treatment

Description:  Eating disorders affect every system of the body. The physical consequences of severe food behaviors often go unseen because the body is highly adaptive. Developing an adequate “medical tool kit”allows clinicians and health care providers know what questions to ask and what physical test should be done to evaluate the severity of the Eating Disorder. With wisdom and humor, Lyn gives practical advice on understanding and addressing medical issues in a non-medical setting.

Location:  The office of Dr. Lauren Muhlheim (4929 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 245, Los Angeles) – free parking in the lot (enter on Highland)

Bio:  Lyn practiced her nursing skills all over the world before finding her way to Monte Nido. Withconsistent compassion she helped to create our current nursing program, managing the well being of our clients’ and a team of nurses at both houses. Lyn’s wisdom and British wit are an essential element of our program, while clients find a safe haven in her kindness.

RSVP to:  drmuhlheim@gmail.com

In an effort to reach out to our community, LACPA is opening up SIGs to nonmembers for a limited time only. Take advantage of this opportunity and encourage your colleagues to attend a SIG during APRIL to experience one of the many benefits of being a LACPA member. In accordance with current policy, non-members will NOT be allowed to attend SIGs during any other months of the year.

image description: A. Janet Tomiyama

Tuesday, May 10 at 7:30 PM

Presenter:  A. Janet Tomiyama, Ph.D., Assistant Professor,Department of Psychology, UCLA, Director, UCLA Dieting, Stress, and Health Laboratory www.dishlab.org

Title:  Dieting, stress, and weight stigma

Description:  Does dieting work to promote long-term weight loss and health? This talk will discuss evidence suggesting the answer is no, and will cover the potential negative consequences of dieting, including stress. Further research on stress and its effects on comfort eating will be presented, as well as novel research on weight stigma and its negative effects on eating, stress, and long-term weight gain.

Location:  The office of Dr. Lauren Muhlheim (4929 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 245, Los Angeles) – free parking in the lot (enter on Highland)

Bio:  A. Janet Tomiyama, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles. She received her B.A. in Psychology in 2001 from Cornell University, and her M.A. and Ph.D. in Social Psychology with concentrations in Health and Quantitative Psychology in 2009 from the University of California, Los Angeles. In 2011, she completed a Robert Wood Johnson Health and Society Scholar Fellowship jointly at the University of California, Berkeley and the University of California, San Francisco. Her research centers around eating, dieting, stress, and weight stigma.  She is one of the leading researchers demonstrating the flaws of BMI as an indicator of health. http://www.nature.com/ijo/journal/vaop/ncurrent/abs/ijo201617a.html

RSVP to:   drmuhlheim@gmail.com

May event is only open to LACPA members.

Five Reasons Parents Should be Included in the Treatment of Children and Adolescents With Eating Disorders

I had the honor of presenting a workshop yesterday along with Therese Waterhous, PhD/RDN, CEDRD. and Lisa LaBorde, Outreach Director for Families Empowered and Supporting Treatment of Eating Disorders (FEAST) at the IAEDP Symposium 2016. Our workshop was entitled, From “Worst Attendants” to Partners in Recovery: Empowering Parents as Agents of Change for Children and Adolescents with Eating Disorders.

image description: photo of Therese Waterhous, Lisa LaBorde, and Lauren Muhlheim

A growing body of scientific research demonstrates that parents and caregivers can be a powerful support for a child in recovery from an eating disorder. This model of care is a radical shift from the traditional individually focused therapeutic approach and requires significant changes in how patients and families are treated within a clinical practice.

During my section of the presentation, I presented Five Reasons to Include Parents in treatment for youngsters with eating disorders. I share them here:

  1. The reason to exclude parents was based on theories that have now been debunked.

In the late 1800s Gull suggested that families were “the worst attendants” for their children with anorexia nervosa, and this set the tone for many years. More recent perpetrators of this viewpoint were Hilda Bruch and Salvador Minuchin. In the historical treatment of eating disorders, parents were blamed and the children were taken away to be fixed by professionals. When ultimately sent back home, parents were told, “Step back,” “Don’t get into a battle for independence, “ and “Don’t be the food police.”

These practices were based on early theoretical models for eating disorders that have not been supported by empirical studies. Research has not been able to identify any particular family pattern that contributes to a child’s eating disorder.

  1. Best practices now state to include parents (and not blame them).

As the following clinical guidelines demonstrate, it is no longer the appropriate standard of care to exclude families from treatment.

The Academy for Eating Disorders’ position paper on The Role of the Family in Eating Disorders:

  • The AED stands firmly against any model of eating disorders in which family influences are seen as the primary cause of eating disorders, condemns statements that blame families for their child’s illness, and recommends that families be included in the treatment of younger patients, unless this is clearly ill advised on clinical grounds. 

The Nine Truths About Eating Disorders consensus document, produced in collaboration with Dr. Cynthia Bulik, PhD, FAED states:

  • Truth #2: Families are not to blame, and can be the patients’ and providers’ best allies in treatment.

The American Psychiatric Association (APA) Guidelines for Eating Disorders also advises:

  • For children and adolescents with anorexia nervosa, family involvement and treatment are essential. For older patients, family assessment and involvement may be useful and should be considered on a case-by-case basis. (p.12)
  1. Research shows better and faster results when parents are included in mental health treatment for their children.

Randomized controlled trials of adolescents with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa show that adolescents who receive family-based treatment, in which parents play a central role, achieve higher rates of recovery and recover faster than adolescents who receive individual adolescent focused therapy. This result is consistent with findings for other psychological disorders, including Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (improved outcome is found when families are included in treatment) and schizophrenia (a large scale study found greater improvement when treatment included family education and support as part of more comprehensive care).

  1. Parents are often good allies in fighting eating disorders.

On the one hand, patients with eating disorders (and especially younger patients) are often significantly impacted by malnutrition. Research shows they commonly have a decrease in brain grey matter, cognitive deficits and anosognosia—a lack of awareness that they are ill. Recovering on one’s own is commonly difficult for an adolescent whose brain is not fully developed and may lack the cognitive ability to challenge negative thoughts, change behavior patterns, and resist urges. Furthermore, they commonly lack the independence adult clients have to purchase and prepare their own food.

On the other hand, parents are there to take care of their children. They can do the heavy lifting. They can be authoritative and require children to eat. It can be difficult for a therapist to develop rapport with a reluctant and resistant adolescent; it is much easier for a therapist to develop a therapeutic alliance with the parents who do want their child to recover. In situations where there are multiple treatment providers, parents can help with the communication between team members as they will likely be seeing them all. Lastly, parents typically buy the food for the household so they have the ability to execute the meal plan.

Eating disorders often take years, not months, to fully resolve. There will rarely be a scenario in which a patient leaves home for a residential setting and comes home “cured.” The reality is that any treatment is only the first stop on the road to recovery–full recovery takes sustained full nutrition and cessation of behaviors for an extended time period and the family, in many cases, can help that happen. So whatever treatment model is used, FBT principles and training are vitally important for families.

  1. Parents are powerful.

In the past, mental health treatment was primarily private; the internet has changed that. Parent support and activist groups such as FEAST, Eating Disorder Parent Support (EDPS), March Against Eating Disorders, and International Eating Disorder Action,have connected parents, given them access to scientific information that was not available to parents pre-internet, and given them the tools to organize. Social media has increased the pace of this information. Parents have access to evidence-based information and are demanding treatment that aligns with it. If they are shut out from treatment, they will hear from other parents that this is problematic. They may change providers if they are dissatisfied with the treatment their child is receiving

There is no greater love than the love of a parent for their child. To work with parents and empower them to help their children get well is one of the most rewarding aspects of my work. Family-Based Treatment is at the forefront of treatments that center the role of parents. Learn more about our approach, Family-Based Treatment.

Condiments, the Final Frontier of Eating Disorder Recovery

By Katie Grubiak, RDN, Director of Nutrition Services

Katherine Grubiak is a Registered Dietitian with a focus on blending Western & Eastern philosophies regarding nutritional healing.

Condiments in Eating Disorder Recovery [image description: assorted condiments and butter]

In our work with clients with eating disorders, we help them to reintroduce recently eliminated and avoided foods that present as part of the eating disorder. We notice that as clients (both adult and child) reintroduce foods, it is often the condiments and sauces that are the last to be confronted. In some situations, clients never successfully spontaneously reintroduce these foods; we have to strongly encourage them.

“Normal” eaters enjoy ketchup on French fries, mayonnaise on a sandwich, and dressing (with oil) on salads. In fine cooking, sauces such as Hollandaise are elements that complete the dish. Watch any cooking show and you will see how integral the sauces are to the meals.

In addition to adding needed flavor and creaminess to dishes, these sauces and condiments also add the necessary dietary fat that is essential to metabolic function, hormone balance, absorption of fat soluble vitamins (Vitamins A, D, E, K), nerve coating, and ultimately brain healing.  It is said that even after weight restoration, for 6 months the body & brain are still recovering.  Gray matter, which is severely compromised in anorexia, only can be re-layered through the help of essential fatty acids. Recommendations are between 30-40% of total calories coming from dietary fat. How about we rename this macro-nutrient “essential fuels” (EFs) to honor its positive and real use in recovery?

We think it is worth pushing these condiments and sauces as one step towards a full recovery for our clients. If you are a person in recovery or a parent of a person in recovery, we hope you will consider the following suggestions:

  • Try one new condiment on a sandwich or side dish per week. This may include: ketchup, mayonnaise, mustard, aioli, etc.
  • Try dipping chips or vegetables in sauces such as Ranch dressing, salsa, or guacamole.
  • Experiment with one new creamy salad dressing (not fat free) on a salad.
  • Eat a meal that has one new sauce, such as a cream sauce on pasta, a sauce on steak, or an Asian curry.

Here are some recipes:

Chimichurri Sauce-with Argentinian roots its used as both a marinade and a sauce for grilled steak. Also try it with fish, chicken, or even pasta (like a pesto). Chimichurri also makes a great dipping sauce for french bread or a yummy spread on a sandwich! image description: slices of baguette with chimichurri on top

  • Prep Time: 8-10 minutes
  • Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup firmly packed fresh flat-leaf parsley trimmed of stems
  • 3-4 garlic cloves
  • 2 TBSP fresh or 2 TSP dried oregano leaves
  • 1/2 cup olive oil (extra virgin cold pressed)
  • 2 TBSP red or white wine vinegar-maybe a rice vinegar
  • 1 TSP sea salt
  • 1/4 TSP ground black pepper
  • 1/4 TSP red pepper flakes (amount depending on level of heat desired)

Finely chop the parsley, fresh oregano, & garlic or place all in a food processor with just a few pushes. Place in a small bowl. Stir in the olive oil, vinegar, salt, pepper, and red pepper flakes to taste. Serve immediately or refrigerate. Perishable-so avoid keeping longer than two days.

Chili Aoli

Condiments in eating disorder recovery [image description: chili aioli in a dish]Use on top of meatloaf, meatballs, or on a sandwich.

Total time: 10 minutes | Makes 1 cup.

  • 1 cup mayonnaise
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
  • 3 1/2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 3/4 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons dark chili powder
  • 3/4 tablespoon paprika
  • Salt and pepper

In a small bowl, whisk together all ingredients until smooth. Taste and season as desired with salt and pepper.

Trader Joe’s Wasabi Mayo can really spruce up a turkey sandwich!  image description: jar of Trader Joe's wasabi mayonnaise

OCD and Eating Disorders – LACPA ED SIG Event – March 2016

image description: photo of Kimberley QuinlanIt’s the time of year when the Los Angeles County Psychological Association SIG events are open to nonmenbers.  So, come try it out.  Details on our next event are as follows:

Thursday, March 3 at 7:30 PM

Presenter: Kimberley Quinlan, LMFT

Title: When OCD and Eating Disorders Collide: Assessment and Treatment Planning for OCD and co-existing Eating Disorders 

Description: Managing Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and a co-existing eating disorder can be quite difficult and require significant attention and prioritizing. A very important goal is to ensure that improvements in the symptomology in one disorder are not due to an increase in compulsivity in another co-existing disorder.

During this presentation, Kimberley will discuss at length how to identify and assess for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder symptoms and how to then prioritize treatment goals and tools in these cases. Participants will learn how to manage clinical time with clients, specifically when their eating disorder has become a part of their OCD compulsions.

Attendees will learn important differentiations between general OCD, OCD food-related obsessions (including Symmetry obsessions and Orthorexia) and Eating Disorder obsessions.   Attendees will learn how to prioritize treatment goals and planning (specifically targeting the use Exposure and Response Prevention and other evidence based treatment tools) when managing OCD and co-existing Eating Disorders. Attendees will also be offered a Q&A for general questions.

Location:  The office of Dr. Lauren Muhlheim (4929 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 245, Los Angeles) – free parking in the lot (enter on Highland)

Bio:

KIMBERLEY QUINLAN is a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist in the State of California. During her training and education, Kimberley dedicated much of her research to the study of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for the treatment of Anxiety Disorders and Eating Disorders.

Kimberley did her internship at the OCD Center of Los Angeles and went on to become the Clinical Director of the OCD Center of Los Angeles. Kimberley currently has a private practice in Calabasas, California. Kimberley provides weekly outpatient, intensive outpatient services, in addition to 2-day Mindfulness Workshops, for those with OCD, Body Focused Repetitive Behaviors’s and other OCD spectrum disorders.

Kimberley has been featured in many world known media outlets, such as LA Times, Wall Street Journal, KCRW public radio, and the Seattle Times, discussing co-existing OCD and eating disorders. Kimberley has also consulted on various mental health issues with programs such as ABC’s 20/20 and Telemundo.

RSVP to:  drmuhlheim@gmail.com

March and April SIG meetings are open to all professionals.  During other months SIG meetings are open to all LACPA members. Nonmembers wishing to attend may join LACPA by visiting our website www.lapsych.org

For Teens With Bulimia, Family Based Treatment is Recommended

Teens With Bulimia Family Based Treatment [image description: family looking at book together]My original eating disorder training began in 1991 with learning Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for bulimia nervosa (BN) under G. Terence Wilson, the co-author with Dr. Christopher G. Fairburn, of the treatment approach that preceded CBT-E. In 2010 I underwent training in Family Based Treatment (FBT) for Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa (AN) and became certified in FBT by the Training Institute for Child and Adolescent Eating Disorders.

CBT is the most effective treatment for adults with bulimia nervosa. It is an individual approach that focuses on reducing dieting and changing unhelpful thinking patterns that maintain the behavior. FBT is the most successful treatment for adolescents with AN. FBT encourages parental control and management of eating disorder behaviors, but does not address distorted thinking regarding shape and weight. Over the last five years, there has been no clear guideline on which treatment I should offer to adolescents with BN.

This changed in September 2015 with the online publication of “Randomized Clinical Trial of Family-Based Treatment and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Bulimia Nervosa” by Daniel Le Grange, Ph.D., James Lock, M.D., W. Stewart Agras, M.D., Susan Bryson, M.A., M.S., and Booil Jo, Ph.D. which has been published in the November Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

In this study, researchers at the University of Chicago and Stanford randomly assigned 130 teens between the ages of 12 and 18 years old with BN to receive either CBT-A (CBT adapted for adolescents) or FBT-BN (FBT for adolescent bulimia). The teens received 18 outpatient sessions over the course of six months. Assessments were conducted at end of treatment and at six and twelve month follow-ups. After the completion of the treatment, bulimia abstinence rates were 39% for FBT patients and 20% for CBT patients. By the six-month follow up, these rates rose to 44% for FBT patients and 25% for CBT patients. These differences were statistically significant. By 12 month follow up, while the bulimia abstinence rate continued to rise for both populations, the difference was no longer statistically significant.

The researchers concluded,

FBT-BN is likely a better initial treatment option compared to CBT-A for those adolescents with clinically significant bulimia behaviors. FBT-BN leads to quicker and higher sustained abstinence rates that are maintained up to 12 months posttreatment…It appears that, similar to their adolescent peers with AN, adolescents with BN can benefit from an approach that actively involves their families in the treatment process. However, given that there were no statistical differences between these 2 treatments at 12 months post-treatment, CBT-A remains a viable alternative treatment for this patient population, especially for those families who would prefer a largely individual treatment or when there is no family available to be of help.

In interviews about the study, Dr. Le Grange said, “Parents need to be actively involved in the treatment of kids and teens with eating disorders.”

This study reinforces my experience. Although I have employed CBT for bulimia in working with adolescents, rarely do adolescents fully embrace the work required on their part for CBT to be successful. I have found it more effective to use FBT with their family and to supplement with some individual CBT if the adolescent appears ready and motivated for additional independent work. Bingeing and purging are serious symptoms carrying the risk of heart and esophageal problems and death. Thus administering a treatment that brings a faster rate of remission of symptoms is a priority.